Frequently Asked Questions

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You can sort our Frequently Asked Questions by category: General Police, Animal Control, or Gang Injunction.
  • Animal Control

    • How do I get a dog license?

      The State of California requires that all pets be licensed. To learn more about how to get a dog license for your pet, visit Pasadena Humane Society's Dog Licensing page.

    • Where is the PHS located and what is the travel time from Monrovia?

      The average travel time from Monrovia to the Pasadena Humane Society & SPCA is 16 minutes. PHS is located at 361 S. Raymond Avenue, Pasadena, CA 91105. Take the Interstate 210 Freeway West, exit Fair Oaks Avenue and turn left onto Del Mar Blvd.  The shelter is located at the intersection of Raymond Avenue and Del Mar Blvd.  On-site parking is available on Raymond Avenue.

    • Who do I call for Animal Control Services?

      Animal-related calls for service should be made to the Pasadena Humane Society & SPCA at (626) 792-7151, anytime - day or night.

    • Who do I contact about dog licensing issues?

      Questions concerning dog licensing issues can be addressed at the Pasadena Humane Society & SPCA or by calling (626) 792-7151, Extension 115. Most pet owners who have previously licensed their pet will receive an annual renewal notice during the month of June each year. The licensing process can be completed by mail.

    • What does it cost to license my dog?

      • Spay or neutered dog - $20
      • Unaltered dog - $60
    • Who will provide animal control field services to our community?

      These services will be provided by state certified Humane Officers supervised and managed by the Pasadena Humane Society & SPCA. These officers receive certified training in accordance with California Corporations Code 14502. In addition, Humane Officers receive ongoing yearly training on a variety of issues associated with their duties.

    • What happens if an animal is injured?

      When an injured animal is located by an Animal Control Officer, they are immediately transported to a qualified veterinarian facility. As part of our animal sheltering contract with PHS, they will provide for emergency and non-emergency care for all animals brought to their facility from Monrovia during regular business hours. After-hours emergency services are provided by a local 24-hour veterinary hospital.

    • What happens when a stray dog is located by Animal Control Officers?

      Identification of stray dogs is easy when animals are properly licensed with the license affixed to their collar and are wearing current ID tags. In these cases, officers can quickly locate the pet’s owner and return them safely home. Animals with microchip technology will be scanned by the officer to determine their identity and returned to their owner. Unidentified animals are taken to PHS and sheltered until claimed by the owner. A photograph of the animal and identifying information is placed on the PHS website to assist owner identification and retrieval.

    • How long are animals held before they are euthanized?

      State law requires that all animals be held for a minimum of five days before they are euthanized. Depending on shelter space availability and a number of other criteria, some animals are held for well beyond the minimum five day requirement.

      Licensed dogs picked up by PHS receive a longer care period.  When found, licensed dogs will be cared for at the PHS for 10 days (longer than a dog without a license).

    • Do you have the ability to scan for microchips on animals?

      Yes, our Animal Control Officers are equipped with microchip readers that allow them to quickly identify those animals with microchip implants.

    • Are officers trained to deal with dogs, cats, rabbits, opossum, raccoons, birds, snakes, chickens, rats, mice, hamsters, squirrels, goats, pigs, deer and bears?

      Animal Control Officers are equipped and trained to handle these and many other types of animals. However, wildlife indigenous to the foothills of Monrovia are the responsibility of California Fish and Game. Animal Control Officers may be called to assist with these types of animal-related calls and liaison with Fish and Game officials who have jurisdiction over these matters.

    • Why are we contracting for animal sheltering services with Pasadena Humane Society & SPCA?

      The Pasadena Humane Society & SPCA is one of three animal shelters within proximity to Monrovia that have the resources to provide sheltering services to our community. PHS was selected based on the following criteria:

      • Friendly and knowledgeable staff
      • Clean facility
      • Good customer service
      • Good adoption rate
      • Reasonably priced
      • Additional services available to community members
    • What additional services are provided by PHS?

      These services are available directly to Monrovia community members. Additional fees may be required for some of these services.

      • Pet adoption
      • Affordable spay and neutering services
      • Vaccinations
      • Microchipping services
      • Behavior and training classes
      • Humane education
      • Dog boarding
      • Dog daycare
      • Emergency response for animal care during disasters
      • Volunteer opportunities
    • What are the business hours of PHS?

      The shelter is open Tuesday through Friday - 9:00 a.m. until 6:00 p.m., Saturdays - 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., and Sundays - 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. It is closed Mondays and major holidays.

    • How do I contact PHS?

      Their business telephone number is (626) 792-7151. They can be located on the internet at www.pasadenahumane.org.

  • Gang Injunctions

    • Do other communities in our region have gang injunctions?

      Many communities in Los Angeles and Orange Counties already have injunctions in place, with several reporting positive results:

      • In the City of Los Angeles, with 37 anti-gang injunctions citywide, there is a reported 33% decline in gang membership and a decline in Part One (serious) crimes of between 30% and 50%.

      • In Hawaiian Gardens, an injunction against members of the Varrio Hawaiian Gardens Gang has resulted in a 24% decrease in crime and a 43% decrease in assaults.

      • In Hollywood, an injunction against the 18th Street Gang has resulted in a 50% decrease in Part One crimes.

      • In Anaheim, an injunction against the Boys from the Hood Gang has seen a 50% decrease in assaults and a 75% decrease in shots fired.

      • In San Juan Capistrano, there has been an 86% decrease in calls for service related to gang activities.

      • In San Clemente, there has been a 58% decrease in calls for service related to gang activities.

      • In Santa Ana, there has been a 50% decrease in calls for service related to gang activities and a 46% decrease in crime.

    • What, besides the gang injunction, has Monrovia been doing to fight gang violence, both short and long term?

      A long list of enforcement, suppression, intervention and prevention strategies are being used daily to take gang affiliated criminals off the streets and, as importantly, to prevent other youths from joining or associating with criminal gangs. Among those many programs and tools now is use in Monrovia are:

      • DAMAGE - Duarte and Monrovia Anti-Gang Enforcement. Ongoing task force composed of Los Angeles County Deputies and Monrovia Police Officers. In 2008 alone, DAMAGE was responsible for more than 400 arrests and 200 weapons being seized. DAMAGE is the backbone of a larger task force.
      • The Community Action Policing (CAP) program that was one of the most innovative in the nation when it was established in the mid-1990s (winning an international award) is still operating effectively in our neighborhoods.
      • The MAGIC (Monrovia Anti-Gang Intervention Committee) program brings police officers and school counselors together to identify at-risk youths and gang associates and to steer them away from gang affiliations and activities.
      • The Monrovia Area Partnership (MAP) program has been working daily in gang-related neighborhoods since 2006 as a direct response to increased criminal activity and has established new and exciting rapport with residents, created new neighborhood resolve, empowered residents to fight back and made great inroads, winning three national awards along the way. Every department in the City is involved along with major components of the community. (Excerpt from a letter recently received from a MAP-area resident: "With joy and hope I report to you that my neighborhood has become quiet and safer. Now the kids come out to play and my neighbors sit with family in their front yards. Some neighbors started walking around the block in the morning or afternoons. Little by little the fear is fading and the sad moments from the past are being forgotten. Most of my neighbors appreciate and notice the difference between how it was and how quiet and safe it feels now.")
      • The High Risk Offenders Program is used to minimize the impact of parolees lining in the community by tracking all parolees released from prison back to Monrovia. A parole agent works alongside Monrovia police officers to vigorously monitor the activities and conduct of parolees living here and to direct parolees to job resources and other appropriate opportunities to assist them in making a successful transition back into the community. Those who fail in this and return to crime are vigorously prosecuted.
      • A Gun Bounty Program offers anonymous informants a $100 reward for informing police about people carrying guns in public places. Several bounties have been paid and many weapons have been taken off the street as a result of this program.
      • Since 1994, Monrovia has enforced a model Truancy Ordinance that has been duplicated by agencies nationwide and in Europe. The program has helped to increase school attendance as well as reduce the number of dropouts. Students are encouraged to stay in school rather than be on the streets where they can involved themselves in gangs and other criminal behavior.
      • The Monrovia Youth Alliance, working through the Santa Anita Family YMCA and the Monrovia Ministerial Association, puts experienced gang and youth outreach professionals on the streets, working daily with gang members and at-risk youth to move them away from crime toward productive lives.
      • A Drug Awareness Resistance Education (DARE) program has been used in Monrovia schools since 1990 in a partnership between the City and the Monrovia Unified School District. Specially-trained officers instruct Fifth Grade students in drug and gang awareness, anger management and violence alternatives.
      • Parenting Classes are offered at no charge by the Police Department in both English and Spanish, promoting a healthy family environment and educating parents to successfully apply learned parenting skills.
      • The Formative Years project offers values and life-training to children at very early stages of their education, with parent involvement at every stage.
      • The Monrovia Reads and Plays Van takes recreation, library and literacy training directly into at-risk neighborhoods on a daily basis.
      • The recently revived Youth Sports Program is providing organized sports for latch-key children after school and serves several hundred youngsters.
      • The Youth Employment Service (YES) program provides summer jobs for at-risk youth and is showing great results in lowering school dropouts and sending kids on to higher education.
      • The Monrovia Youth Commission brings teenagers together in community service projects.
      • The City combats graffiti with the help of a contracted removal company. Graffiti is immediately reported and removed within 24 hours. Incidents of graffiti are reported to the Police Department's Special Enforcement Team, which investigates and prosecutes gang-related graffiti.
      • A Community Notification System uses a computerized system to alert residents and businesses by telephone during times of emergency and is used for crime warnings, missing children, etc.
      • Neighborhood Watch groups are set up throughout the community and have grown significantly in membership in recent years.
    • What have been the results in those communities in which the injunctions are already in place?

      • In the City of Los Angeles, with 37 anti-gang injunctions citywide, there is a reported 33% decline in gang membership and a decline in Part One (serious) crimes of between 30% and 50%.
      • In Hawaiian Gardens, an injunction against members of the Varrio Hawaiian Gardens Gang has resulted in a 24% decrease in crime and a 43% decrease in assaults.
      • In Hollywood, an injunction against the 18th Street Gang has resulted in a 50% decrease in Part One crimes.
      • In Anaheim, an injunction against the Boys from the Hood Gang has seen a 50% decrease in assaults and a 75% decrease in shots fired.
      • In San Juan Capistrano, there has been an 86% decrease in calls for service related to gang activities.
      • In San Clemente, there has been a 58% decrease in calls for service related to gang activities.
      • In Santa Ana, there has been a 50% decrease in calls for service related to gang activities and a 46% decrease in crime.
    • Do other communities have injunctions against gang members?

      Yes, many do and many others are in the process of establishing injunctions. Besides Monrovia, at least seven other communities in Los Angeles County are also currently seeking injunctions through the District Attorney's office.

    • Is the City of Duarte involved?

      No. The City of Duarte has not joined in this effort.

    • Who sought the injunction?

      The City of Monrovia, through its Police Department, and the County of Los Angeles, through its Sheriff Department. Files on gangs and individuals have been compiled by the joint Special Enforcement Team of those two departments.

    • Where are the geographic areas involved and what are the restrictions?

      Monrovia's injunction specifies that the identified members of the two gangs cannot congregate in public, drink alcohol, unlawfully possess weapons or cause graffiti inside of, or within 100 yards of, a "safety zone" that covers large, specific portions of the City and adjacent unincorporated County area - from Mountain Avenue on the east to Fifth Avenue on the west, and from Live Oak Avenue on the south to Foothill Boulevard on the north. It also imposes a curfew on adult gang members from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. daily. Curfew for those under 18 begins at 8 p.m. each evening.

    • What are the safeguards against possible abuse of the injunction?

      As only specified individuals are enjoined from specified activities in specified areas, the injunctions cannot be used in an indiscriminate or blanket fashion. They cannot prohibit, for instance, a group of people from congregating on street corners if they are not the specified individuals who have been enjoined by the courts. They cannot be used to target age groups, racial groups or entire neighborhoods. Only specific activities of specific individuals are subject to the injunctions. Due process through the normal judicial system is rigorously followed. Individuals who are enjoined have their day(s) in court, the same as anyone who is served with an injunction or charged with a misdemeanor - they have all rights afforded to any citizen under the law.

    • Who are the individuals who are subject to the injunction in Monrovia?

      Identified individuals who are known members of the Du-Roc Crips and Monrovia Nuevo Varrio gangs and who reside and operate in the City of Monrovia and in County territory immediately adjacent to Monrovia. In all, 17 MNV and 21 Du-Roc gang members have been specifically identified.

    • What is the penalty for violating the injunction?

      Violation of the injunction is a misdemeanor, the same as any violation of a court order. The alleged violator would appear again before a judge to plead his case. The judge would hear the case, decide the guilt or innocence of the individual, and impose an appropriate penalty if warranted.

    • Then what?

      The individuals are served with court papers saying they are being prohibited from engaging in specified activities in specified areas. A hearing date is set at which the individual may appear in court with an attorney to argue against the prohibitions. The judge then decides whether to issue the injunction, based on the individual case.

    • How are individuals, activities and areas identified?

      A police agency compiles a list of crimes that have occurred over time that were tied to a gang, along with a list of individuals who are suspected of, or have been convicted of, involvement in those crimes. Activities that police believe contributed to or enabled the criminal involvement of specific individuals are also identified, as is a geographic area in which the crimes and the related activities took place.

    • What is a gang injunction?

      A gang injunction is a restraining order against specific activities, in a specific geographical area, by specific individuals with known gang affiliations. For instance, if a gang is selling drugs at night on street corners, an injunction could prohibit a specified gang member or members from being on the street within a specified neighborhood between the hours of 8 p.m. and 8 a.m.

    • What's done with that information?

      Files on the specific individuals' police records, activities and geographic involvements are submitted to a judge. The judge then rules on whether those specific individuals should be prohibited from such activities within the specified geographic region.

  • General Police

    • Is the Monrovia Police Department hiring?

      Find out about current job opportunities and the Police Officer hiring process in Monrovia by visiting our hiring page.

    • How do I file a traffic accident report?

      You can file a report by going to the Monrovia Police Department at 140 E. Lime Avenue. For additional information, please call (626) 256-8000.

    • How do I pay my parking ticket?

      You can pay your parking ticket in person by going to the Monrovia Police Department at 140 E. Lime Avenue, or you can pay online by clicking here.

    • How do I get my vehicle released?

      Click here  for more information.

    • How do I get my property released?

      Click here for more information.

    • How do I contest a parking citation?

      Contesting a parking citation is a three step process that begins with an Administrative Review. Read more.

    • How do I file a complaint?

      For information on the complaint process and to print out the complaint form, click here.

    • How do I file a police report?

      You can file a report by going to the Monrovia Police Department at 140 E. Lime Avenue. For additional information, please call (626) 256-8000.

    • How do I start a Neighborhood Watch Group?

      A Neighborhood Watch Group empowers neighborhoods by providing residents with ways to reduce blight and crime in their community. Contact Community Policing Officer Yolanda Juarez at (626) 256-8036 for more information.